ENVEA have been at the forefront of environmental monitoring and process control over four decades and with the emergence of the industrial internet of things (Industry 4.0) ENVEA are yet again providing innovative solutions which harness the potential of this new industrial era.

At Clean Air Technology Expo taking place on 11-12 September at the NEC, Birmingham, ENVEA will be demonstrating its range of Particulate Emissions Instruments alongside its advancements in data capture, storage and analytics that will combine the world of industrial particulate and flow monitoring with the latest in smart technology.

ENVEA is sticking to its commitments and proudly presents today’s achievements:

  • In this series of articles, we will be exploring the relationship between industrialisation and particulates alongside the emergence of particulate abatement, monitoring and regulation through each of the four industrial eras. In this first article we will be examining Industry 1.0 in relation to particulates and how advancements in this era influence modern day power generation and manufacturing.
  • The eco-design initiated in the new range of air quality monitoring products has made possible the consumption reduction of our products by more than 60% while avoiding energy-intensive air conditioning systems. In 2019, as a world premiere, the first solar powered station for monitoring the air quality has been inaugurated.
  • ENVEA has displayed in a waste treatment plant the first measurement tools to optimize the injection of reagents in order to reduce pollutant emissions.

Industry 1.0

  • Industry 1.0 (1760-1840) is considered to be the first industrial revolution with the transition to steam and water powered machinery in manufacturing, transforming industries such as agriculture, textiles and mining. The efficiencies made within the steam engine design enabled its use in manufacturing processes (such as Iron production) and developments in rail and shipping saw the expansion of trade and increased manufacturing output. During this period coal burning became widespread.
  • Industry 1.0

  • Particulates during Industry 1.0 Although combustion processes were not yet able to be used as a source for power generation as today, the increased use of coal in industry had a significant impact on pollution levels. There was little understanding of the existence of fine particles and the associated health implications and little regulations controlling emissions. It has been estimated that by the late 18th century ambient PM levels were in excess of 300mg/m3 in London. During this period there was limited technology for pollution control and regulations (in the UK). The first regulation of emissions from industry would not be enacted until the late 1840’S.
  • Successes achieved in the implementation of tools to encourage emission reductions will continue to be spread out with installations scheduled in China in the year. This activity being under development should represent approximately 30% of the group’s implementations in 2023.
  • Particulates during Industry 1.0 Although combustion processes were not yet able to be used as a source for power generation as today, the increased use of coal in industry had a significant impact on pollution levels. There was little understanding of the existence of fine particles and the associated health implications and little regulations controlling emissions. It has been estimated that by the late 18th century ambient PM levels were in excess of 300mg/m3 in London. During this period there was limited technology for pollution control and regulations (in the UK). The first regulation of emissions from industry would not be enacted until the late 1840’S.
  • Technological advancements during Industry 1.0 Whilst processes for abating emissions were not in place during the first industrial revolution, advances in science were establishing what would become the technology of the future. Early Electrostatic Precipitator concept following Corona discharge discovery in 1824 The discovery of corona discharge as a method to remove particles from an aerosol was made in 1824 by M Hohlfeld. This lead to the invention of the Electrostatic Precipitator (ESP) by Frederick Gardner Cottrell in 1907, a method widely used today in dust and gas abatement from industrial processes. The first electrical generator was invented in 1831 by Michael Faraday. Despite its basic design this initial invention set the foundations for the development of electrical power generation as we know it today. The discovery of electromagnetic induction has provided many innovations in Industry including wireless energy transfer which has only begun to be widely used in practical applications during the 21st century.
  • Successes achieved in the implementation of tools to encourage emission reductions will continue to be spread out with installations scheduled in China in the year. This activity being under development should represent approximately 30% of the group’s implementations in 2023.
  • Further information